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Tuesday Election Features Two Contested Local Races

When residents in Grundy County go to the polls on Tuesday, there will be just two contested local races on the ballot that will decide who will be their party’s nominee in the November.
First District Commissioner and Seventh District State Representative will have two candidates from which to choose on the Republican ballot, with those winners advancing to the November General Election.
Current First District Commissioner Gene Wyant is facing opposition this time from Don Sager, with the winner then facing independent candidate Jimmy Martin in November. Martin’s name, while not on Tuesday’s ballot, will be on the November ballot after having submitted a petition to the county clerk for his name to appear on the ballot.
Chillicothe resident Rusty Black and Trenton resident John Myers are the two GOP candidates for the Seventh District State Representative post. Because of term limits, current State Rep. Mike Lair is unable to seek another term. The winner in Tuesday’s election will have no opposition on the November ballot.
Other local candidates, all Republicans, running without opposition are Second District Commissioner Joe Brinser, Sheriff Rodney Herring, Collector/Treasurer Barb Harris, Assessor Kathy Veatch, Public Administrator Jill Eaton and Coroner Dewayne Slater.
For Sixth District U.S. Congress, incumbent Sam Graves has two opponents on the Republican side, Kyle Reed and Christopher Ryan. Democrats seeking the post are Travis Gonzalez, Edward Fields, David Blackwell, Kyle Yarber and Matthew McNabney. Russ Monche is the Libertarian candidate.
Current U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt is being challenged on the Republican side by Kristi Nichols, Bernie Mowinski and Ryan Luethy. The Democrat candidates are Chief Wanna Dube, Cori Bush, Jason Kander and Robert Mack. Jonathan Dine and Herschel Young are the Libertarian candidates.
Statewide office candidates include:
Governor – Catherine Hanaway, Eric Greitens, John Bruner and Peter Kinder, Republican; Leonard Joseph Steinman II, Chris Koster, Eric Morris and Charles Wheeler, Democrat; and Cisse Spragins, Libertarian.
Lieutenant Governor – Arnie AC Dienoff, Bev Randles and Mike Parson, Republican; Winston Apple, Russ Carnahan and Tommie Ferguson Sr., Democrat; and Steven Hedrick, Libertarian.
Secretary of State – Will Kraus, Jay Ashcroft and Roi Chinn, Republican; Bill Clinton Young, Robin Smith and MD Rabbi Alam, Democrat; and Chris Morrill, Libertarian.
Treasurer – Eric Schmidt, Republican; Pat Contreras and Judy Baker, Democrat; and Sean O’Toole, Libertarian.
Attorney General – Josh Hawley and Kurt Schaefer, Republican; and Jake Zimmerman and Teresa Hensley, Democrat.
A sample ballot, which lists candidates and polling places, appears on page 5 of today’s Republican-Times.
Polls in Grundy County will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday. Local results will be carried on Tuesday night on the R-T website at www.republican-times.com and on Tele-News 11, beginning with absentees. Complete voting results will be included in Wednesday’s Republican-Times newspaper as well as the website.

I Remember Trenton – One-House Schools

Photo Courtesy of Linda Crooks Youth from throughout the area are at the Riverside Country Club today, taking part in the annual Rex Pettegrew Memorial Youth Golf Tournament. Results from the tournament, along with photos of the division winners, will appear in the Republican-Times sports section on Monday.

Photo Courtesy of Linda Crooks
Youth from throughout the area are at the Riverside Country Club today, taking part in the annual Rex Pettegrew Memorial Youth Golf Tournament. Results from the tournament, along with photos of the division winners, will appear in the Republican-Times sports section on Monday.

Editor’s Note: Persons who have a memory to share about any topic related to Trenton and the surrounding area are asked to do so by e-mailing the Republican-Times newspaper at [email protected] Stories should include the writer’s name, address and telephone number along with a short bio of the writer. Stories are to be submitted by e-mail only and will appear periodically in the newspaper.

By Harry W. Bratton
The country (rural) one-room schools in Grundy County began passing out of existence about 1960. Economics and demographics dictated that these smaller (mostly rural) schools be consolidated or reorganized into new, larger, more efficient, more modern and better equipped schools. This, of course, required bussing most of the students for miles when formerly they mostly walked, rode ponies or bicycles to school.
The furthest student home was 2.8 miles one way from the school I attended (Pleasant Ridge) and all but 100 yards of that distance was dirt roads. And, yes, it was “uphill in both directions” for that student, who lived one-half mile west of the school and was one of the closest students.
In revisiting the “olden days,” of the 1930s and 1940s at our country school, I remember the schoolhouse, located on a dirt road, on a one-acre sloping lot fenced off from a crop field.
The grass and weeds in the playground were partially worn off and that part of the playground became a loblolly, as did the dirt road, after a rain or snow. We played softball and often would lose the ball in the weeds across the road or in the crop field. The pony barn (a lean-to shelter) was located in the northwest corner of the lot away from the playing field.
On either side of the lot were the privies. Sometimes, during a high wind, one or the other of the privies would blow over. On one memorable occasion, a girl was temporarily trapped in a privy when it was blown over on its door.
The coal shed was near the east side of the schoolhouse. Sometimes the teacher would invite one of the miscreants, indolents or recalcitrants among us to the coal shed where an appropriate “attitude adjustment” would be administered. Discipline was paramount since there could be up to 30 students attending grades 1 through 8.
Water was pumped by hand into a water bucket and hand-carried from a cistern well located about 30 yards west of the schoolhouse. The water was then poured into a large container, fitted with a push button spigot, from which we could fill our drinking cups or get water for handwashing. The cistern well was supplied with rainwater piped from the roof of the schoolhouse.
Inside the schoolhouse, it was hot in the spring and fall and cold in the winter. Heat was provided by a coal fired heating stove located in one corner at the front of the classroom. Fresh air was obtained by opening the door or the windows.
There was no electricity and no other lighting was available during school hours. Lanterns were used during after-hours box suppers and school plays.
Two small “cloak rooms” where we hung our coats and caps were located on either side of the entry door at the back of the room. One cloak room was for the girls and the other was used by the boys. Each room had a shelf to hold the “dinner buckets” (lunch pails).
And, overshoes were to be cleaned and lined neatly along the wall.
The blackboard and a pull-down roll of maps were on the wall at the front of the room. Nearby was a table, chairs and benches situated next to an old, out-of-tune, upright piano.
At the back of the room, against one cloak room wall were several bookshelves containing well-worn reading and reference books.
On the opposite side of the room sat the teacher’s desk, from where the whole classroom could be observed.
While we didn’t know it at the time, these were very primitive school accommodations and similar to the other 70-plus rural schools in Grundy County at that time. However, we learned our lessons well in spite of those conditions.
Or else.

KCC Closed For Floor Work

The Ketcham Community Center on the North Central Missouri College campus will close at 1 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 5 for the annual refinishing of the gym floor.
The KCC will re-open at 5 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 8 for regular hours of business.

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GEC Annual Membership Meeting

Grundy Electric Cooperative will host its annual membership meeting on Thursday, Aug. 11 at Trenton High School.
Registration and dinner begins at 4:30 p.m. with musical entertainment by the Marks Family from Jefferson City. The business meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. with reports on the state of the cooperative and the election of one director from Area 1 and one director from Area 4.
All Grundy Electric Cooperative member-owners are

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Rotary Club Has Work Day

Members of the Trenton Rotary Club worked on club assignments during Thursday’s meeting.
Each member was asked to sign up for at least one committee in the areas of club administration, membership, public relations, service projects and foundation. Chairmen were also assigned and those who were not present or who had not expressed a preference prior to the meeting were placed on a committee.
During the business meeting, Kevin Harris

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Mary L. Sterling

Mary L. Sterling, a 78-year-old resident of Trenton, died on Thursday, July 28, 2016, at Saint Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City.
Arrangements are pending under the direction of Lindley Funeral Home at Chillicothe.

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Losing Pond Water

By Jeff Berti
Most ponds lose some water due to leaks and it’s not uncommon for the water level in ponds to fall in the summer or during times of drought. However, the Missouri Department of Conservation says if your pond is chronically low, then you may have a problem that needs attention.
The most common cause of pond leaks is tree roots penetrating the dam. Cutting large trees isn’t

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Marsha Hurst In 2016 THS Alumni Honoree

Marsha Hurst

Marsha Hurst

Mailboxes will soon be filled with the annual Trenton High School alumni newsletter and this year’s edition is bigger than usual.
Thanks to the contributions of hundreds of alums, the detailed planning by the honor classes and the Foundation Trust for THS, the 2016 edition is 40 pages in length and filled with lots of stories and pictures.
Headlining the front page is the announcement of Marsha Owings

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NCMC Queen Contest On Sunday

Echo Essick

Echo Essick

Lindsey Hendren

Lindsey Hendren

Emily Milazzo

Emily Milazzo

Claire Stuedel

Claire Stuedel

Four area young women are seeking the title of North Central Missouri Fair Queen, with coronation to take place on the first day of next’s week annual fair.
Echo Essick of Hale, Lindsey Hendren of Madison, Emily Milazzo of Galt and Claire Stuedle of Cameron are contestants in the pageant, which gets under way at Sunday at the Hoover Community Theater located

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